Monday, May 11, 2009

Okay, it's time to confess. I haven't wanted to come out and be all wishy-washy in public. But since I'm continuing to be wishy-washy and some of you have been wanting some info, I better let the cat out of the bag.

I'm not sure I want to do the TIP horse thing. It's strange how things keep getting in the way. First I had my trip all planned and then the crew at the corrals had an unexpected meeting and the corrals were closed. Then my grandma got sick. Then I fell on my head. I finally felt better for one whole day, felt renewed and had the energy to tackle the project, decided I WAS going to do it. And today the chiropractor broke my head again. (Not literally, but it kinda feels like it.) Other little considerations have had me thinking this isn't the time, as well. Like the fact that Bella can be ridden, and shouldn't be put on the back burner, as I had planned to do before I had her lameness diagnosed. Other stuff.

I want so badly to learn from some more mustangs, but I'm starting to think that now is not the time. A friend of mine told me that I'm having trouble deciding for a reason, and eventually something will happen that will make the right thing obvious. I think I'm at that point. For now.

I will do this eventually if they keep the program going. I may do it eventually anyway, but on my own dime, if I have to. I might find another way to help horses and learn from them at the same time.

Certainly, if anyone wants a mustang gentled, I'd be happy to be the one to do it. I would happily drive down tomorrow and get their horse and bring it to them at whatever level of "gentle" they preferred. But I'm not going to go out and do it right now when I'm not sure the horses will even find homes.

So if you know anyone within a couple hundred miles of Potlatch, Idaho, that would like to adopt a mustang and take advantage of this Trainer's Incentive Program, send them my way.

Sorry to disappoint. I'm disappointed too, but I think this is the right decision. Just for now. I still hold high hopes that I'll be able to do this in the future.

(Looks like I went from wishy-washy at the beginning to decisive at the end. I guess I've made my decision. It feels bad but it feels kinda good. I can move on now...)

12 comments:

Kara said...

A friend of mine is interested in adopting (I introduced him to the online adoption). He currently boards his other horses, though, so doesn't have a place to keep one until it is gentled, although I know he'd be interested in doing the gentling. I think he's looking at a yearling. But I also don't know how truly serious he is, since he is also recovering from a surgery. He did ask me if I knew anyone who could keep a horse for him if he was crazy enough to decide he wanted to adopt. Would you like me to see how serious he is and point him your direction?

Kara said...

BTW, my friend is in Moscow.

And I do understand how you are feeling about bringing on additional horses, when you still need to find the time to work with the ones you've got now.

How is Bella's stifle doing nowadays?

Lea and her Mustangs said...

That is why we have not done it Andrea. You have alot on your plate right now.

Pony Girl said...

Sounds like you've thought it out and know it is the best decision for you right now. There will always be another time. It's great you're willing to help someone out with some gentling, too!

Linda said...

Tough decision, but you know what's best for you, your family and your other horses.

Kate said...

It sounds to me like stepping back at this time is the right thing for you - it's really smart of you to realize that and not take on too much. You can do it later if and when you're ready. Hope your head feels better!

Jessie said...

I think you're making a good decision. Not many people are looking to buy horses right now. I feel the same way you do. I'd love to participate in the TIP program, but I'd be too afraid that I wouldn't find a home for the horse. I think finding a potential adopter before picking up the mustang is the way to go.

Andrea said...

Kara, that would be great if you gave him my contact info. We could probably work something out if he's really wanting to adopt.

arlene said...

I don't think your being wishy- washy. It's a lot to take on and if it doesn't feel like the right time then it's not.

Kara said...

I talked to my friend and he's doing well after his surgery, but has decided that it's still not the right time to be adopting a new mustang. He's going to wait until after he finishes his degree and his wife and him move to the new place they'll get when they both get real jobs...then he can have his horses back at his place and can really focus on a mustang. Sounds like I've helped sell him on mustangs, though. That and the fact that one of his horses probably was a reservation mustang that had been used as bucking stock, but he doesn't really know his history. He's a beautiful dark brown pinto with a very short stocky build. My friend worked a lot with him to get him over bucking and he says that he's an extremely sensible horse...when on the trail and such, compared to his arabian.

Andrea said...

That's great that he wants to adopt, even if it isn't right now.

Wow, that's brave to take on a former bucking horse!

Kara said...

Yeah, he did a LOT of work with him. He took him to a clinic a long time ago with Steve Rother (back before Steve Rother was as well known as he is now). They basically had to buck him out, because he wouldn't stop. When my friend put a bareback pad on him and cinched it up, he exhausted himself trying to buck it off. He thought he'd get used to it after awhile, but no, he kept bucking, rest, buck, rest...he never quit. So at the clinic. Steve Rother got on a horse, and basically drove Diablo around every time he started to buck. Once he quit bucking with the saddle, then he had my friend get on and they did the same thing. Everytime he went to bucking, he'd drive him physically with his horse. Diablo wouldn't listen to a person on the ground, but being shoved by a horse seemed to do the trick. He did learn not to buck. My friend got a hold of this horse at a barn where he was keeping his arabian. The horse had been bought for a little girl, but that obviously wasn't going to work. Beside bucking, he was also super fearful about being handled and approached. But my friend really liked his build, and so asked if he could have him and see what he could do with him. Diablo still has issues, but he's much better, although my friend hasn't really been able to work consistently with him the last few years.