Tuesday, October 29, 2013

Funny

I need to speed this up and put it to Benny Hill music.  But for now it's the long version.  I find it totally entertaining, which is saying a lot because I don't like to watch videos on the computer, especially of me.  But I don't expect you to be as entertained as I am or to watch the whole thing.  I just wanted to show how hard he tries, at liberty, to do what I'm asking.  He has come so far!  But obviously I need to have a better way of telling him he's in the right spot, he's done moving and he can quit trying so darn hard!  Funny boy. 


video




5 comments:

Keechy said...

Adding in the clicker would do that for you. No need to use food if you really don't want to. A rest and a scritchy would be a good reward too, though the food makes the process faster because they earn the click, get the treat, then are ready to try again while they are still chewing. :) I can never go past how easy some things are with a clicker. To have the horse actively working to earn that click and treat instead of just reacting to pressure, well, it just looks and feels so different.

Keechy said...

And of course the click ends the behaviour so they are listening for it and ready to stop when they hear it, instead of stressing and keeping moving. Keeps them thinking and present instead of going all lizard brain.

Andrea -Mustang Saga said...

If anything was going to convince me to get out my clicker it would be this video. I think you're right, it would help.

Keechy said...

Just keep in mind that, once he is clicker savvy, if he keeps moving when you've clicked then it shows he is stressing a little too high so you can take that under account and go back a few steps to where it is easier. My sis's current horse took a long time to stop to the click under saddle because he was in the habit of being a total stress head while being ridden. He got it really fast in hand but not under saddle. When he finally began to stop on his own to the click when riding, she knew he was learning to relax under saddle at last.

Cindy D. said...

My savvy horse of 18 years won't even move up to a mounting block like that. In fact he is notorious for stepping away just as you go to get on, leaving you in a heap on the ground next to him, while he looks down and laughs at you.